Windows and doors as a photo motive

Autumn decoration on a door in Salem

Windows and doors are my favorite photo opportunity


"I prefer to take pictures ..." - it was this heading that struck me first. Gudrun from reisebloggerin.at called for a blog parade, the topic of which immediately appealed to me. And aroused curiosity. I then rummaged through my photo archive and came across astonishing things: it is not food or grape leaves that are most often found there. And it's not Petar in the restaurant either, although I often photograph him eating. No, it is windows and doors that are photographed particularly often in my photos. They tell stories and are for me an image of the respective culture in which I am currently staying. Windows in Dublin look very different from windows in the Alps. Windows on the Main are decorated differently than windows in Carinthia. They always tell stories of the people who live behind them and give an insight into what they find beautiful. They are an expression of regional culture and encourage you to think about what is going on behind the glass panes that draw my attention.

 

Log cabin on Manitoulin Island
Windows and doors at a log cabin on Manitoulin Island
Door in Salem Massachusetts
Windows and doors at a historic residential building in Salem Massachusetts

 

It is similar with doors: we like to visit cities and stroll aimlessly through the town. During such forays we often come across interesting-looking houses, the entrances of which attract us. Be it through baroque portals whose sculptural decorations take our breath away. Be it through Art Nouveau elements, the decoration of which takes us back to the beginning of the last century. Be it through bright colors and pretty door handles that tempt us to use it to find out what's behind it. Doors have something inviting that seems to say, "Find out where I'm going."

 

Window and door in a Cape Dutch house
Windows and doors in a Cape Dutch house in South Africa

 

Here is a selection from my photo archive that shows how different doors and windows can be and how they represent the character of a city or region. Let yourself be carried away to distant countries or nearby regions whose characteristics can be recognized by their windows and doors. Which window or door do you like best?

 

Pub window in Dublin
Pub window in Dublin
Window over a bank entrance in Stockholm
Window over a bank entrance in Stockholm
Window in Trieste
Window in Trieste
Window in Newfoundland
Window in Newfoundland
Window in Iphofen
Window in Iphofen
Window in a Fossa cheese factory in Emilia Romagna
Window in a Fossa cheese factory in Emilia Romagna
Window in a whaler shed at the Arctic sea
Window in a whaler shed at the Arctic sea
Window at a farmhouse in Sweden
Window at a farmhouse in Sweden
Window on the Weissensee in Carinthia
Window on the Weissensee in Carinthia
Entrance to the Maritime Museum in Lunenburg
Entrance to the Maritime Museum in Lunenburg
Entrance in Viking settlement in Newfoundland
Entrance in Viking settlement in Newfoundland
Baroque window in Graz
Baroque window in Graz

 

I could attach a whole series of photos showing windows or doors, and each photo shows a different world. What is your favorite photo subject? Show us, and join in the blog parade of Gudrun, I'm curious what other travel bloggers like to photograph.

Do you already know:

 

Source: own research on site

 

Windows and doors as a photo motive

Monika Fuchs

Monika Fuchs and Petar Fuchs are the authors and publishers of the Food and Slow Travel blog  TravelWorldOnline. They have been publishing this blog since 2005. TravelWorldOnline has been online since 2001. Their topics are trips to Savor, wine tourism worldwide and slow travel. During her studies Monika Fuchs spent some time in North America, where she - partly together with Petar Fuchs - traveled to the USA and Canada and spent a research year in British Columbia. This intensified her thirst for knowledge, which she satisfied for 6 years as an adventure guide for Rotel Tours and then for 11 years as a tour guide for Studiosus Reisen around the world. She was constantly expanding her travel regions, but curiosity still gnawed at her: "What's beyond the horizon? What else is there to discover in this city? Which people are interesting here? What do they eat in this region?" As a freelance travel journalist (her articles have appeared in DIE ZEIT, 360° Canada, 360° USA, etc.), she is now looking for answers to these questions as a travel writer and travel blogger in many countries around the world. Petar Fuchs produces the videos on this blog as well as on YouTube. Monika Fuchs from TravelWorldOnline is among Germany's top 50 bloggers in 2021. Find more Information about Monika and Petar Fuchs here.

4 thoughts too "Windows and doors as a photo motive"

  1. Difficult decision, but the window in Emilia Romagna has appealed to me at first sight ... Thank you for your contribution Monika!

  2. I like the entrance to the Viking settlement in Newfoundland! Wonderful, it also looks as if these are not stones at all on the "wall" but peat or wood.
    Of course the ensemble reminds me of Northern Europe.
    I also really like the window in Newfoundland. It tells stories.

    Sunny greetings, Sabine

    1. If I remember correctly, the wall in L'Anse aux Meadows was made of peat. The “houses” were built underground to protect them from the winds that blow down from Labrador unchecked.

      I took the window in Newfoundland in a small family restaurant in Cupids. It was decorated very lovingly. I especially liked the view out over the bay. The place itself actually tells stories: this is where the first European settlers went ashore and were led by Sir John Guy.

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