Irish Pub in Ireland - Why do people love Irish Pubs?

Irish pub in Dublin

Why do people love Irish pubs?

An Irish Pub in Dublin or Ireland is a place where friends meet to have a good time together. You drink beer – preferably a Guinness. If you want, you can order home-made cooking that is typical of the region. Music is also part of an Irish pub. But only Irish music. Pubs with a group singing traditional Irish songs are the best. It certainly doesn't take long for the visitors to join in the songs. The later the evening, the funnier the company becomes. Then it happens that the pub visitors start to dance to the music. I've experienced this again and again on my travels through Ireland.

A visit to an Irish pub, the living room of the Irish

During our stay in Dublin we had the opportunity to study the Irish pub culture a little more closely. There are a few things you should know before you visit an Irish pub Dublin or elsewhere in Ireland should know. According to the Dublin MM-City travel guide, the pub counter is a man's fortress. We can't quite confirm that, as the picture shows. A visit to the Irish Pub is as typical of Ireland as the island's greenery. This pub we're in Kilkenny visited, looked more like the living room of the Irish at lunchtime, as people of both sexes and all ages met here at the bar, just like a big family.

 

 

Maybe it was because we were in an Irish pub in Kilkenny on an Irish holiday, maybe it was lunchtime. Because Irish Pub food is popular as a lunch, it usually consists of simple and homemade dishes such as Irish stew, soups or pies, which are still quite cheap. Meanwhile, it is worthwhile, even for new ones Food trends Look out for. Innovative cooks interpret Irish specialties New.

 

 

 

Pint of Smithwick's
Pint of Smithwicks in the Irish Pub in Dublin

In the evening in an Irish pub in Ireland

In the evening the picture really changes: then whole clusters of men crowd around the counter in an Irish pub in Dublin or elsewhere in the hope of getting hold of the next pint. A true Irishman doesn't ask for a glass or half a beer, no, he knows exactly what kind of beer he wants. "A pint of Guinness" or "a pint of Smithwicks" is a popular choice, although I have to admit that I like the latter better than the standard Irish dark drink.

 

Irish pub taps
Irish pub taps

 

For a number of years, people have had to push through crowds of people in front of the entrance to an Irish pub in Dublin or elsewhere, as the pubs themselves are strictly non-smoking. So if you want to enjoy your beer with a cigarette, you have to go outside. And many do.

 

Pictures in the Irish Pub in Dublin
Pictures in the Irish Pub in Dublin

800 Irish pubs - in Dublin alone

In Dublin there are supposed to be around 800 such Irish pubs. We didn't test all of them, of course, but we did test a few of them. And we noticed differences. While in Temple Bar, the region on the south bank of the Liffey in Dublin, you mainly find tourist-oriented pubs, in which almost every music group offers live music, things look different in the pubs off the tourist strip. This is where the locals meet for a pint to discuss the day's events or to drink a whiskey as a nightcap before going to bed. The music here comes from the CD player, if at all, but the noise level in these pubs is usually so high that you can barely notice it.

The History of Irish Pubs in Ireland

Did you know that Irish pubs are not an Irish invention at all? They have only existed since the early 17th century. Until then, the Irish frequented taverns or alehouses. The pubs or public houses were first brought to Ireland by the English. So it's no wonder that pubs first spread out in Dublin, the seat of the English colonial government. These were very popular. By the mid-17th century, despite attempts to limit the number of pubs, there were already 1500 Irish pubs in Dublin. The pubs originally brewed their own beer, but that quickly changed. Thus new commercial breweries sprang up around James Street in Dublin, supplying the pubs with their beers. It is therefore not surprising that the headquarters of the Guinness Brewery located.

The culture of Irish pubs in Ireland - you should know that

If you don't want to come out as a stranger in Irish pubs, you should know a few customs: I already mentioned above that they ask for a pint. If you're not that familiar with Irish beers, it's best to just try out the ones that are offered as a draft - from the tap. The names of the available beers are usually written on the taps. In the pubs, you pay as soon as you receive the drink. This way you avoid cumbersome calculations after a social evening and can leave when you feel like it. By the way, tipping is not customary in pubs. If you mean well with the barman, you can invite him for a drink. Most of them will usually turn down this offer unless they want to become an alcoholic quickly. If you get to know Irish people in a pub, it's easy to be invited to a round. It is best to return the favor with one of the same kind.

Last Order Please at the Irish Pub in Ireland

Usually at 23.30 p.m. it says “last order please”, which means that you still have half an hour before the Irish Pub closes. The curfew can be later in Temple Bar's pubs: after all, they don't want to drive away the tourists there. However, if you want to get to know quaint and genuine Irish pubs, it is better to look for one in one of the other districts of Dublin or in one of the small towns on the island.

Irish pubs in Ireland that visitors recommend

According to Google ratings, these Irish pubs are among the best in Ireland:

The best Irish pubs in Dublin

  • The Brazen Head, 20 Lower Bridge St, Usher's Quay, Dublin, D08 WC64, Ireland
  • The Temple Bar Pub, 47-48, Temple Bar, Dublin 2, D02 N725, Ireland
  • Brannigans, 9 Cathedral St, North City, Dublin, D01 FH29, Ireland

Best Irish Pubs in Belfast

  • Kelly's Cellars, 30-32 Bank St, Belfast BT1 1HL, United Kingdom
  • Maddens, 74 Berry St, Belfast BT1 1FJ, United Kingdom
  • Duke of York, 7-11 Commercial Ct, Belfast BT1 2NB, United Kingdom

The best Irish pubs in Galway

  • O'Connell's Bar, 8 Eyre Square, Galway, H91 FT22, Ireland
  • The Crane Bar, 2 Sea Rd, Galway, H91 YP97, Ireland
  • O'Connor's Famous Pub, Salthill House, Upper Salthill Rd, Galway, H91 W4C6, Ireland

Conclusion: a visit to the Irish Pub is part of every visit to Ireland

With these tips and recommendations you are well equipped to make a visit to the Irish Pub an experience. If you stick to the customs, you can quickly make acquaintances with the locals in the pub. In any case, we wish you a lot of fun and Slainte (Cheers).

 


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Irish pub in Dublin
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Do you already know:

Source Irish Pub: Research on site and the Travel Guide Dublin MM City* by Michael Müller Verlag, ISBN: 987-3-89953-774-1

Text Irish Pub: © Copyright Monika Fuchs and TravelWorldOnline
Photos Irish Pub: © Copyright Monika Fuchs and TravelWorldOnline

Irish Pub in Ireland - Why do people love Irish Pubs?

2 thoughts too "Irish Pub in Ireland - Why do people love Irish Pubs?"

  1. Hahaha, the description of pub culture seems familiar to me. After my visit to Ireland there is also a "Instructions for use for pubs" to read. Sometimes we have stood there a bit stupid ...

    1. Who do you say that to? :) I think back to my first pub visits with a shudder. Since I'm from a faux-pum in the next entered :).

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